Humans can evolve into cyborgs: what the latest study of neuroscientists has shown

15.06.2024/21/30 XNUMX:XNUMX    3

A new study by neuroscientists suggests that humans could evolve into cyborgs with "tweezer-like" bionic hand tools. That is, the next step in human evolution may be the further integration of technology with flesh and blood.

But, according to a new study, this technology does not mimic human features like modern prostheses. Neuroscientists have found that people actually feel more connected to bionic instruments that look like tweezers than to transplants that resemble human hands. write The Sun.

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Using virtual reality (VR), the researchers tested whether people could feel that the claw of the tweezers was part of their body.

The participants could successfully embody the "bionic instrument" and the prosthetic hand with equal degrees. However, people were faster and more accurate in virtual tasks with tweezer hands than when they used a human hand.

Humans can evolve into cyborgs: what the latest study of neuroscientists has shown

“In order for our biology to seamlessly merge with the tools, we need to feel that the tools are part of our body. Our results show that people can perceive the tweezers as an inseparable part of their body," said Ottavia Maddaluno, a neuroscientist at Rome's Sapienza University and first author of the study.

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The researchers believe that the participants identified the hands more with the tweezers because of their simplicity: "In terms of the pinch task, the tweezers are functionally similar to the human hand, but simpler, and also computationally easier for the brain," Maddaluno added.

Humans can evolve into cyborgs: what the latest study of neuroscientists has shown

The next step is to study whether these bionic tools can be implemented in patients who have lost limbs.

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"We also want to investigate the plastic changes that this kind of bionic tool can induce in the brains of both healthy participants and amputees," Ottavia said.